Author Archive | Max

Kautsch Law, LLC

Fresh Tips: Sample Request for Records

Note: The primary purpose of this request form is to easily enable requestors to include in their requests all statutory language in the Kansas Open Records Act (KORA) related to public agencies’ duties to disclose public records. Although a KORA request is not required to be in any particular form, including the language here in […]

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sunshine coalition logo

Open Records Act brings Sunshine

Advocates of open government have good reason to celebrate this Sunshine Week, a national celebration of government transparency, which runs from Sunday, March 12, through Saturday, March 18.  In Kansas, the week also represents an annual commemoration of the Kansas Sunshine Laws, which primarily include the Kansas Open Records Act (KORA) and the Kansas Open […]

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ag office

Attorney General’s Office “holds open” KOMA complaint; takes almost four years to respond

This spring, the Manhattan Free Press finally received a response from the Attorney General’s Office (AGO) to an open meetings complaint it filed in 2012 against county officials.  Although the response finds the officials in violation of law, the AGO declined to penalize them.  Moreover, the response implies that the complainant is somehow responsible for the delay and lack […]

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KORA

Revising KORA: Amending the definition of “public records” to include emails sent to and from non-government accounts that relate to public business

In light of the controversy last year over the state budget director’s use of a private email account to discuss public business, the Kansas Legislature will likely attempt to revise the Kansas Open Records Act (KORA) this coming session. Because the budget director sent and received emails on the private account, they were not in […]

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Fresh Tips: Requesting disclosure of probable cause affidavits

A little more than a year ago, two Kansas statutes, K.S.A. 22-2302 and K.S.A. 22-2502, were amended to give the public, including journalists, a right to see affidavits that police file to justify making arrests and conducting searches. As is often the case with new law, not everyone initially agrees on how to interpret it. So courts […]

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